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PLEASE REBLOG Last chance to save Net Neutrality

mostlysignssomeportents:

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There’s only 36 hours left comment on the FCC’s proposal to allow for Net Neutrality-shredding “Internet fast lanes” that let phone companies to pick Internet winners and losers—it’s time to act.

Read more…

(via emergentfutures)

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twicr:

If the current Supreme Court can’t yet figure out email, how in the world are they going to deal with the impending “robots in politics” crisis? 

Um… here’s my question. I believe that anyone can be crazy and run for Congress (that may in fact represent a primary qualification).

What I can’t figure out though is who are the 5% of Oklahoman citizens who voted for this guy?

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maxistentialist:

The Onion:

Nation’s Cable Companies Announce They’re Just Going To Take $100 From Everyone
Offering no justification for the action aside from their own desire to do so, executives from the nation’s leading cable companies announced plans Wednesday to take $100 from every one of their subscribers. “At midnight EST tonight, we will deduct exactly $100 from each of our customers’ accounts and, frankly, there is nothing that anyone can do about it,” said Comcast President and CEO Brian L. Roberts in a morning press conference, flanked by like-minded executives from Time Warner, Dish Network, Cox, and numerous other cable companies, all of whom confirmed the non-refundable $100 charge would apply to all subscribers regardless of service package and would most certainly not be applied as credit toward future charges to the account. “The bottom line is we want $100 from you, so we’re just going to take it. As a cable subscriber, you really have no other option here. And we’ll probably do it again in a few weeks, too.” The cable company CEOs added that any subscriber who was dissatisfied with the plan was more than welcome to call their customer service lines.

maxistentialist:

The Onion:

Nation’s Cable Companies Announce They’re Just Going To Take $100 From Everyone

Offering no justification for the action aside from their own desire to do so, executives from the nation’s leading cable companies announced plans Wednesday to take $100 from every one of their subscribers. “At midnight EST tonight, we will deduct exactly $100 from each of our customers’ accounts and, frankly, there is nothing that anyone can do about it,” said Comcast President and CEO Brian L. Roberts in a morning press conference, flanked by like-minded executives from Time Warner, Dish Network, Cox, and numerous other cable companies, all of whom confirmed the non-refundable $100 charge would apply to all subscribers regardless of service package and would most certainly not be applied as credit toward future charges to the account. “The bottom line is we want $100 from you, so we’re just going to take it. As a cable subscriber, you really have no other option here. And we’ll probably do it again in a few weeks, too.” The cable company CEOs added that any subscriber who was dissatisfied with the plan was more than welcome to call their customer service lines.

(via emergentfutures)

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dash:

It’s not a bug…it’s a feature.

dash:

It’s not a bug…it’s a feature.

(via emergentfutures)

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wilwheaton:

kickass-pics:

it comes with 2 subwoofers 


SUBWOOFERS CARL.

wilwheaton:

kickass-pics:

it comes with 2 subwoofers 

SUBWOOFERS CARL.

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"In February, in a New Yorker piece originally titled “Is Amazon bad for books?,” a small press publisher, Melville House co-owner Dennis Johnson, described how Amazon had bullied him into signing up for its paid distribution service despite refusing to relinquish any information to him about his actual on-site sales.

Johnson described how, after his initial refusal to play on their terms, Amazon representatives approached him at Book Expo and advised him to “get with the program.” He also described the way Amazon unsummarily pulled the “Buy” buttons from Melville House titles after he publicly criticized the company.

Proponents of Amazon’s lower pricing strategies argue that Amazon is the underdog in the publishing monopoly, not the other way around. But the fact remains that Amazon is a company that singlehandedly controls 30% of the market share of the entire publishing industry. And unlike its competitors, it has a publishing arm, a distribution arm, and a retail arm. Although the price-fixing that the Big Six and Apple were engaged in was blatantly illegal, the maneuver was a unilateral way of competing as a group against Amazon’s predatory pricing—that is, its ability to leverage its other retail holdings to offer rock-bottom pricing for its books, effectively decimating the landscape of other booksellers.

Increasingly, the rhetoric about Amazon’s bullying tactics is that the company is violating the same antitrust laws that it used to spear Apple and the Big Five on the Department of Justice’s hook. “Monopoly achieved,” Johnson wrote after the verdict."

You can’t pre-order JK Rowling’s newest book from Amazon because Amazon is holding it hostage

"Better for Amazon is rarely better for the publishing industry."

(via bookshop)

Nope. I’m not defending Amazon here. At the same time, they control only 30% of the book sales market. Customers have lots of options of where to buy the book. And publishers have lots of options for where to sell their books. Not least of which are direct.

Publishers tried to stop the future of publishing for years and created the environment where Amazon could rise to prominence. I’m not suggesting that Amazon is an innocent lamb here. Or, for that matter, not playing serious (and consumer-unfriendly) hardball. But to suggest publishers are helpless victims - or that they’ve been more customer friendly - seriously misrepresents the facts of the story.

(via wilwheaton)

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georgetakei:

A PSA… http://ift.tt/1hYL2kr
Photoset

my-stereo-heart-beats-for-you:

The fear of progression since the dawn of man

Yup.

(via wilwheaton)

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ravendroppings:

dendroica:

"I can’t remember where I heard this, but someone once said that defending a position by citing free speech is sort of the ultimate concession; you’re saying that the most compelling thing you can say for your position is that it’s not literally illegal to express."
(via xkcd: Free Speech)

Thank you XKCD!  This is so accurate.

ravendroppings:

dendroica:

"I can’t remember where I heard this, but someone once said that defending a position by citing free speech is sort of the ultimate concession; you’re saying that the most compelling thing you can say for your position is that it’s not literally illegal to express."

(via xkcd: Free Speech)

Thank you XKCD!  This is so accurate.

(via wilwheaton)

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"The ultimate problem for Apple, Beats and any other media distributor is that people want to experience art for themselves. These marketers speak in terms of data, simplification, and “music discovery,” an asinine formalization of “turning on the radio.” It’s not about discovery, the “user experience,” or their “trust” in your brand: it’s about finding a way we can arrive at music, on our own terms, free of the hype, advertisements, PR chicanery, and editorial bias you’re offering. We’re not paying you to tell us what to like: we’re paying you to provide us an easy platform through which to navigate music. Shut up, and take our money."

Chris Ott (via newspeedwayboogie)

Yes, this.

(via whitneymcn)

(Source: medium.com, via fred-wilson)